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The Seven Sisters January 26, 2012

Posted by jtintle in Deep Space, Space Fotos.
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Description:

In astronomy, the Pleiades, or Seven Sisters (Messier object 45 or M45), is an open star cluster containing middle-aged hot B-type stars located in the constellation of Taurus. It is among the nearest star clusters to Earth and is the cluster most obvious to the naked eye in the night sky. Pleiades has several meanings in different cultures and traditions.

The cluster is dominated by hot blue and extremely luminous stars that have formed within the last 100 million years. Dust that forms a faint reflection nebulosity around the brightest stars was thought at first to be left over from the formation of the cluster (hence the alternate name Maia Nebula after the star Maia), but is now known to be an unrelated dust cloud in the interstellar medium that the stars are currently passing through. Astronomers estimate that the cluster will survive for about another 250 million years, after which it will disperse due to gravitational interactions with its galactic neighborhood.

Additional Info:

18 exp. x 300 ‘ISO 1600
Canon 450D Jap REFRIGERACION
SW 200/1000
Nq6pro
Kit lunatic pursuit
DSS
1.7 Core Pixinsight

Submitted by:

Alcarreño (Raul Villaverde)

Location:

Ocentejo (Guadalajara)-Spain-

Date:

October 02 2011

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Aurora, Stars, Meteor, Lake, Alaska October 9, 2007

Posted by jtintle in Planets, Space Fotos.
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See Explanation.  Clicking on the picture will download  the highest resolution version available. 

Credit:

Bud Kuenzli

Description:

Sometimes, after your eyes adapt to the dark, a spectacular sky appears. In this case, a picturesque lake lies in front of you, beautiful green aurora flap high above you, brilliant stars shine far in the distance, and, for a brief moment, a bright meteor streaks by. This digitally fused breathtaking panorama was captured late last month across one of the Chena Lakes in North Pole, Alaska, USA, and includes the Pleiades open cluster of stars on the image right. The shot is unusual not only for the many wonders it has captured simultaneously, but because lakes this far north tend to freeze and become non-reflecting before a sky this dark can be photographed.

Constellation Construction July 20, 2006

Posted by jtintle in Planets, Space Fotos.
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See Explanation. Moving the cursor over the image will bring up an annotated version. Clicking on the image will bring up the highest resolution version available.
Credit & Copyright:

Jerry Lodriguss (Catching the Light)

Explanation:

This lovely twilight scene, recorded last April, finds a young crescent Moon low in the west at sunset. Above it, stars shine in the darkening sky but they too are soon to drop below the western horizon. These stars and constellations are prominent in the northern hemisphere winter sky and as the season changes, slowly give way to the stars of summer. Sliding your mouse over the picture will detail the constellations and stars in view, including Orion, Gemini, Auriga, Perseus, and the Hyades and Pleiades star clusters.

John’s Note:

Well I snagged this one off of the Astronomy Picture of the Day website, since they used

onmouseover

WordPress.com doesn’t seem to like it. So if you want to see the orginal head on over to the APoD.

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