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Just an Update for you Loyal Readers January 12, 2006

Posted by jtintle in Site Info.
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As most of you have noticed my posting of images have slowed down, that would be due to my new job, and looking for a new place to live. So updates might not be as consistant as they were. Probably not for a few months or so.

With that said, I would like to offer someone out there a chance to continue the postings. WordPress.com blogs allow for multiple authors. So if there is someone out there who would like to fill in for a few months, then send me an email at jtintle at gmail.com

I would like to thank everyone who visits the site regularly. I will say this site will be back once I get everything settled.

M45: The Pleiades Star Cluster January 10, 2006

Posted by jtintle in APoD, M45, Nebula, Pleiades, Seven Sisters, Space Fotos.
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See Explanation.  Clicking on the picture will download  the highest resolution version available.

Credit & Copyright: Robert Gendler

Explanation: Perhaps the most famous star cluster on the sky, the Pleiades can be seen without binoculars from even the depths of a light-polluted city. Also known as the Seven Sisters and M45, the Pleiades is one of the brightest and closest open clusters. The Pleiades contains over 3000 stars, is about 400 light years away, and only 13 light years across. Quite evident in the above photograph are the blue reflection nebulae that surround the brighter cluster stars. Low mass, faint, brown dwarfs have also been found in the Pleiades. (Editors’ note: The prominent diffraction spikes are caused by the telescope itself and may be either distracting or provide aesthetic enhancement, depending on your point of view.)

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The Phases of Venus January 10, 2006

Posted by jtintle in APoD, NASA, Space Fotos, Venus.
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See Explanation.  Clicking on the picture will download  the highest resolution version available.

Credit & Copyright: Wah!

Explanation: Venus goes through phases. Just like our Moon, Venus can appear as full as a disk or as a thin as a crescent. Venus, frequently the brightest object in the post-sunset or pre-sunrise sky, appears so small, however, that it usually requires binoculars or a small telescope to clearly see its current phase. The above time-lapse sequence, however, was taken over the course of many months and shows not only how Venus changes phase but how it’s apparent angular size also changes. In the middle negative image, Venus is in a new phase, the same phase that occurred during its rare partial eclipse of the Sun in 2004.

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