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The Perseus Cluster of Galaxies December 31, 2005

Posted by jtintle in APoD, Deep Space, Milky Way, NASA, NGC 1275, Perseus Cluster, Rancho Del Sol Observatory, Space Fotos.
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See Explanation.  Clicking on the picture will download  the highest resolution version available.

Credit & Copyright: Ken Crawford (Rancho Del Sol Observatory)

Explanation: Here is one of the largest objects that anyone will ever see on the sky. Each of these fuzzy blobs is a galaxy, together making up the Perseus Cluster, one of the closest clusters of galaxies. The cluster is seen through a foreground of faint stars in our own Milky Way Galaxy. Near the cluster center, roughly 250 million light-years away, is the cluster’s dominant galaxy NGC 1275, seen here just left of picture center. A prodigious source of x-rays and radio emission, NGC 1275 accretes matter as gas and galaxies fall into it. The Perseus Cluster of Galaxies is part of the Pisces-Perseus supercluster spanning over 15 degrees and containing over 1,000 galaxies. At the distance of NGC 1275, this view covers about 1.5 million light-years.

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