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Mercator Projection of Huygens’s View May 4, 2006

Posted by John Tintle (MtO deadbait) in Huygens, NASA, Saturn, Space Fotos, Titan, University of Arizona.
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Mercator Projection of Huygens's View

Target Name: Titan
Is a satellite of: Saturn
Mission: Cassini-Huygens
Spacecraft: Cassini Orbiter
Huygens Probe
Instrument: Descent Imager/Spectral Radiometer
Product Size: 14997 samples x 10830 lines
Produced By: University of Arizona / DISR
Full-Res TIFF: PIA08113.tif (487.3 MB)
Full-Res JPEG: PIA08113.jpg (4.937 MB)
Click on the image to download a moderately sized image in JPEG format (possibly reduced in size from original).
Original Caption Released with Image:

Click here for annotated version of PIA08113 Mercator Projection of Huygens's View
Annotated Mercator
Projection of Huygens’s View

This poster shows a flattened (Mercator) projection of the Huygens probe’s view from 10 kilometers altitude (6 miles). The images that make up this view were taken on Jan. 14, 2005, with the descent imager/spectral radiometer onboard the European Agency’s Huygens probe.

The Huygens probe was delivered to Saturn’s moon Titan by the Cassini spacecraft, which is managed by NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. NASA supplied two instruments on the probe, the descent imager/spectral radiometer and the gas chromatograph mass spectrometer.

The Cassini-Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the mission for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate, Washington, D.C. The descent imager/spectral radiometer team is based at the University of Arizona, Tucson.

For more information about the Cassini-Huygens mission visit http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/home/index.cfm

Image Credit:
ESA/NASA/JPL/University of Arizona

Great Observatories Present Rainbow of a Galaxy April 25, 2006

Posted by John Tintle (MtO deadbait) in Chandra X-ray Observatory, Deep Space, JPL, NASA, Space Fotos, University of Arizona.
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NASA's Spitzer, Hubble and Chandra space observatories teamed up to create  this multi-wavelength, false-colored view of the M82 galaxy. The lively  portrait celebrates Hubble's

Target Name: M82 Galaxy
Mission: Hubble Space Telescope (HST)
Spitzer Space Telescope (SST)
Spacecraft: Spitzer Space Telescope (SST)
Instrument: Chandra X-ray Telescope
Infrared Array Camera (IRAC)
Visible Light
Product Size: 640 samples x 480 lines
Produced By: California Institute of Technology
Full-Res TIFF: PIA08093.tif (45.01 MB)
Full-Res JPEG: PIA08093.jpg (799.8 kB)

Original Caption Released with Image:

NASA’s Spitzer, Hubble and Chandra space observatories teamed up to create this multi-wavelength, false-colored view of the M82 galaxy. The lively portrait celebrates Hubble’s “sweet sixteen” birthday.

X-ray data recorded by Chandra appears in blue; infrared light recorded by Spitzer appears in red; Hubble’s observations of hydrogen emission appear in orange, and the bluest visible light appears in yellow-green.

About the Movie
M82 is shown in all its wavelength glory. Dissolving from Chandra X-ray Observatory images of three X-ray energy bands to images in three bands of the infrared spectrum taken by the Spitzer Space Telescope, and ending with the Hubble Space Telescope’s visible- and near-infrared-light image. The three observatories’ images were composited to reveal the galaxy’s stars, as well as gas and dust features.

Note: The size of the Full-Res TIFF for the still image is 4299 samples x 3490 lines.

Image Credit:
NASA/JPL-Caltech/STScI/CXC/UofA/ESA/AURA/JHU

Smokin’ Hot Galaxy April 12, 2006

Posted by John Tintle (MtO deadbait) in Spitzer Space Telescope (SST), Deep Space, NASA, Space, Space Fotos, University of Arizona.
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Cigar galaxy

This infrared image from NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope shows a galaxy that appears to be sizzling hot, with huge plumes of smoke swirling around it. The galaxy, known as Messier 82 or the “Cigar galaxy,” is in fact, smothered in smoky dust particles (red) blown out into space by the galaxy’s hot stars (blue).

It took all three of Spitzer’s instruments to show that the galaxy is also surrounded by a huge, hidden halo of smoky dust that appears red in infrared image. Of those instruments, Spitzer’s infrared spectrograph told astronomers that the dust contains a carbon-containing compound, called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon. This smoky molecule can be found on Earth in tailpipes, barbecue pits and other places where combustion reactions have occurred.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona


+ Full Resolution

Quick Picture While I have a moment. February 15, 2006

Posted by John Tintle (MtO deadbait) in APoD, European Space Agency, Saturn, Space Fotos, Titan, University of Arizona.
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See Explanation.  Clicking on the picture will download  the highest resolution version available.

Rotating Titan in Infrared Light

Credit: VIMS Team, U. Arizona, ESA, NASA

Explanation: Titan is one of the strangest places in our Solar System. The only moon known with thick clouds, this unusual satellite of Saturn shows evidence of evaporating lakes created by methane rain. The clouds that make Titan featureless in visible light have now been pierced several times in infrared light by the robot Cassini spacecraft currently orbiting Saturn. These images have been compiled into the above time-lapse movie. Like Earth’s Moon, Titan always shows the same face toward its central planet. It therefore takes Titan about 16 days to complete one rotation. Titan has numerous areas of light terrain with some large areas of dark terrain visible near the equator. Small areas of brightest terrain might arise from ice-volcanoes and have a high amount of reflective frozen water-ice. Titan’s surface was imaged for the first time early last year by the Huygens probe, which survived for three hours on a cold and sandy dark region

Bright Highlands and Dark Plains December 2, 2005

Posted by John Tintle (MtO deadbait) in Cassini, European Space Agency, Huygens, JPL, NASA, Saturn, Space Fotos, Titan, University of Arizona, USGS.
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Bright Highlands and Dark Plains

Target Name: Titan
Is a satellite of: Saturn
Mission: Cassini-Huygens
Spacecraft: Huygens Probe
Instrument: Descent Imager/Spectral Radiometer
Product Size: 1310 samples x 778 lines
Produced By: University of Arizona
Full-Res TIFF: PIA06441.tif (3.061 MB)
Full-Res JPEG: PIA06441.jpg (101.9 kB)

Image Credit: ESA/NASA/JPL/University of Arizona/USGSExplanation: This is a perspective view of the surface of Saturn’s moon Titan near the Huygens probe landing site that includes the bright-dark boundary between the bright highlands and lower dark plains. This provides stereo coverage with a resolution of about 50 feet per pixel (roughly 15 meters) and a convergence angle of approximately 15 degrees. The perspective image is color-coded in altitude with blue lowest and red highest. The total relief is approximately 500 feet (roughly 150 meters) and the area covered is about 0.6 by 2 miles (1 by 3 kilometers). The valleys exhibiting dark drainages in the brighter higher, terrains have steep sides ranging up to approximately 30 degrees.

A stereo pair of images (insert) was acquired from the Huygens descent imager/spectral radiometer. The left image was acquired from 9 miles (14.8 kilometers) above the surface with the high resolution imager; the right from 4 miles (6.7 kilometers) altitude with the medium resolution imager.

The Huygens probe was delivered to Saturn’s moon Titan by the Cassini spacecraft, which is managed by NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. NASA supplied two instruments on the probe, the descent imager/spectral radiometer and the gas chromatograph mass spectrometer.

View from Titan’s Surface November 30, 2005

Posted by John Tintle (MtO deadbait) in European Space Agency, Huygens, JPL, NASA, Saturn, Space Fotos, Titan, University of Arizona.
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View from Titan's Surface

Target Name: Titan
Is a satellite of: Saturn
Mission: Cassini-Huygens
Spacecraft: Huygens Probe
Instrument: Descent Imager/Spectral Radiometer
Product Size: 504 samples x 718 lines
Produced By: University of Arizona
Full-Res TIFF: PIA06440.tif (362.5 kB)
Full-Res JPEG: PIA06440.jpg (21 kB)

Original Caption Released with Image: Images from the European Space Agency’s Huygens probe descent imager/spectral radiometer side-looking imager and from the medium resolution imager, acquired after landing, were merged to produce this image.

The horizon’s position implies a pitch of the imager/spectral radiometer, nose-upward, by 1 to 2 degrees with no measurable roll. “Stones” in the foreground are 4 to 6 inches (10 to 15 centimeters) in size, presumably made of water ice, and these lie on a darker, finer-grained substrate. A region with a relatively low number of rocks lies between clusters of rocks in the foreground and the background and matches the general orientation of channel-like features in the panorama of PIA06439). The scene evokes the possibility of a dry lakebed.

The Huygens probe was delivered to Saturn’s moon Titan by the Cassini spacecraft, which is managed by NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. NASA supplied two instruments on the probe, the descent imager/spectral radiometer and the gas chromatograph mass spectrometer.

The Cassini-Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the mission for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate, Washington, D.C.

For more information about the Cassini-Huygens mission visit http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov.
Image Credit: ESA/NASA/JPL/University of Arizona

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